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Marriott Rewards Members Can Now Give Points to Support ECPAT-USA

Marriott Rewards Members Can Now Give Points to Support ECPAT-USA

CUSTOMERS CAN JOIN IN THE FIGHT AGAINST SEX TRAFFICKING OF CHILDREN

Members of the Marriott Rewards loyalty program will have the option to donate their points to ECPAT-USA to support the organization’s work in fighting the sexual exploitation of children and sex tourism around the world. ECPAT-USA will be featured on Giving.MarriottRewards.com, scheduled to launch on December 11th, which allows loyalty members to donate their points to select organizations reflective of the company’s recently launched sustainability and social impact platform, Serve 360: Doing Good in Every Direction. The platform includes a new goal of training 100% of its people to recognize the signs of human trafficking.

“Hotels are critical partners in ending child sex trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation,” said Carol Smolenski, Executive Director of ECPAT-USA. “We’re very grateful to Marriott for helping us turn our expertise into training for hotel employees so they can identify and take action against sex trafficking. And now we thank Marriott for giving their guests the opportunity to support ECPAT as part of their ongoing commitment to human rights and social responsibility.”

“Building off our 2007 Sustainability goals, Marriott is proud to issue our next generation of goals, inclusive of social and human rights targets to address some of the world’s most pressing challenges,” said Tricia Primrose, Global Chief Communications Officer at Marriott International and Serve 360 Executive Leadership Council Co-Chair. “Associates and customers want to work for and do business with a company that aligns with their values and drives positive community impact. We are proud to be part of the solution.”

 

ABOUT MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL

Marriott International, Inc. is a leading global lodging company with more than 6,400 properties in 30 leading hotel brands spanning 126 countries and territories. Founded by J. Willard and Alice Marriott and guided by family leadership for over 90 years, Marriott embraces its global responsibility and unique opportunity to be a force for good. Guided by their 2025 Sustainability and Social Impact Goals, as well as the UN Sustainable Development Goals, Marriott commits to creating positive and sustainable impact wherever they do business.

 

ABOUT ECPAT-USA

ECPAT-USA is the leading policy organization in the United States seeking to end the commercial sexual exploitation of children through awareness, advocacy, policy, and legislation. ECPAT-USA is a member of ECPAT International, a network of organizations in 88 countries working together to protect every child’s basic human right to grow up free from the threat of sexual exploitation and trafficking.

ECPAT-USA’s mission is to protect every child’s basic human right to grow up free from the threat of sexual exploitation and trafficking. We envision a world in which no child is bought, sold, or used for sex. More than 25 years ago, ECPAT-USA became the first U.S.-based nonprofit to work on the issue of commercial sexual exploitation of children. ECPAT-USA started with sex tourism, helping to get legislation passed that ensured that Americans who traveled abroad to buy sex with minors could be prosecuted in the US for sexually exploiting children in other countries. Six of the ten largest international hotel chains—including Hilton, Wyndham and Hyatt--have signed on to ECPAT’s program to prevent sex tourism, as have Delta and American Airlines.

No Vacancy: How Hotels Can Fight Trafficking

From policies to training that matters—hotels can make a difference.

Child sex trafficking is a crime that happens across the United States, often in hotel rooms. While the hospitality industry is not responsible for trafficking, it does have an important role to play in helping to stop it.  

ECPAT-USA recently released a report, No Vacancy for Child Sex Traffickers, which shows the extent and impact of our training efforts. Over the next few weeks, we will share a series of blogs that will teach you about the issue, highlight stakeholders who can help fight child sex trafficking, and give you ideas from the report for how to get involved. If you work in the hospitality industry, this blog is for you! If not, please share it with your friends and family who can have a direct impact.

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With the use of online classified ads, child sex trafficking is not only on the streets, but also behind the closed doors of local hotel rooms. Pimps rent rooms in hotels, then go online to create an ad in adult sexual services pages, and finally sell victims right out of the hotel or have victims meet purchasers at nearby hotels.  

Hotel rooms are a preferred venue for the sale of children because traffickers believe they are anonymous at hotels, giving them a sense that there is little risk in their behavior. They also believe that hotels are risk-free because they believe training on indicators of child sex trafficking is not widespread.

Hotels can help stop child sex trafficking by training their associates. Hotel associates are more likely to witness trafficking than the average person. Training teaches people working in hotels how to identify instances of child sex trafficking and how to safely and effectively address any instances they may see.

Many hotels are implementing training. No Vacancy for Child Sex Traffickers, shows that half of all hotels in the United States have had training for their associates.

Still, there is more work to be done. While 40% of hotel properties in the United States have access to ECPAT training, not all training is reaching associates on the ground level.

 

What Hotels Can Do

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Adopt policies and procedures related to the sexual exploitation of children and have resources available to properties. Hospitality brands must develop policies that state a zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation of children and develop procedures to respond to suspected instances of such exploitation.

Official policies send a message to associates that putting an end to the commercial sexual exploitation and human trafficking is important to the company. Companies must also provide their employees with a protocol (procedure) for responding to any suspicions of exploitation.

One example of a great policy against the sexual exploitation of children is the Hyatt Hotels Corporation Human Rights Statement. In addition to stating a clear repudiation and zero tolerance policy of child sex trafficking, the Hyatt statement also references human rights standards and states their open door policy to encourage associates to report any incidents.

Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group’s Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is another excellent example of a hotel brand policy. Their policy clearly states what associates should do if they suspect an instance of child sex trafficking:  “All employees must be vigilant and immediately report to managers, supervisors, the Legal department or the Business Conduct and Ethics Hotline, as appropriate, all situations that come to their attention in the Company’s premises or businesses where sexual exploitation of children is suspected or appears to be intended.”

Whatever a company’s reporting protocol is, it should be clearly stated and easy to find in their anti-trafficking policy.

Hotel brands interested in creating a policy and procedures related to the sexual exploitation of children can contact ECPAT-USA.

Hotels must also mandate that all associates working in all hotel properties, whether they are franchised OR owned, have training.

Hotel brands that offer training for their employees have taken an important step to combat child sexual exploitation, but what does that training do if it is not being used? This issue must become part of on-the-job training.

Employees who are well-trained on the issue will comfortably execute their company’s protocol for responding to the issue. This prevents employees from frantically reacting to situations, which could lead a violent response from an exploiter.

While the data in the report does show that ECPAT-USA training has far reach, the study also found that training does not always reach the front-line of hotels. Some hotel properties whose parent companies have policies and commitments to protect children are not training on the issue. This is an ongoing challenge with hotels that do not mandate but only suggest training to properties in their portfolio.

A staggering 52% of hotel properties in the U.S. are franchised, rather than owned and operated by hotel brands themselves, which means the brand is more hands-off. But for this issue, things need to be different! Training must be required at franchised properties.

To date, a number of brands have moved towards requiring instead of suggesting training to properties and other brands must follow. Marriott mandates human trafficking training for all associates in all of their properties, including franchisees. Similarly, as a brand standard, Hyatt International mandates that all hotels take human trafficking training but does not specify which training franchised hotels participate in.

In addition to being the right thing to do, taking these steps can protect hotels from legal, financial, or image problems should an instance of child sex trafficking occur at one of their properties.

To learn all of the steps hotels must take, or for more information, visit ecpatusa.org/novacancy.

No Vacancy: How You Can Fight Child Sex Trafficking On Your Next Trip

In recent years buying fair trade coffee and clothing has become mainstream but something we at ECPAT-USA have noticed is that we never hear our friends say they are traveling responsibly. The concept of responsible travel is similar to that of purchasing fair trade goods— you choose to spend your money ethically and with respect for human rights.

Choosing a hotel is an opportunity to use your purchasing power for good—to help stop child sex trafficking.

Last week, ECPAT-USA released a report, No Vacancy for Child Sex Traffickers, which shows the extent and impact of our training efforts. Over the next few weeks, we will share a series of blogs that will teach you about the issue, highlight stakeholders who can help fight child sex trafficking, and give you ideas from the report for how to get involved. Later this week we will be highlighting hotels, and the steps they can take to combat this scourge. In this  we’ll give you tips for how to be a more responsible traveler!

While child sex trafficking may seem like a crime that happens in far away places, it happens more than you think throughout the United States.

With the use of online classified ads, child sex trafficking is not only on the streets, but also behind the closed doors of local hotel rooms. Pimps rent rooms in hotels, then go online to create an ad in adult sexual services pages, and finally sell victims right out of the hotel or have victims meet purchasers at nearby hotels.  

While the hospitality industry is not responsible for trafficking, it does have an important role to play in helping to stop it.

Hotel rooms are a preferred venue for the sale of children because traffickers believe they are anonymous at hotels, giving them a sense that there is little risk in their behavior. For this reason, hotel associates are more likely to witness trafficking than the average person. In response, we ask hotels to train their associates on the indicators of trafficking and how to respond to it.

Many hotels are doing just that. The report we released last week, No Vacancy for Child Sex Traffickers, shows that half of all hotels in the United States have had training for their associates. It also lists which hotels in the U.S. have signed ECPAT’s Tourism Child-Protection Code of Conduct, a set of guidelines travel companies, including hotels, agree to take to combat child sex trafficking; one of those steps is providing training.

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One hotel brand leading the way on training is Marriott. Marriott requires associates at all the properties in their portfolio to take human rights training that covers trafficking, which is a step beyond some hotels that just recommend training.

Accor Hotels, another ECPAT-USA partner, has taken an innovative approach on this issue by tying bonuses for their managers to training. Accor managers must have held anti-trafficking training at their properties to get their bonuses. Numerous other hotels are implementing their own initiatives.

On your next trip, stay at one of these hotels.

By choosing to stay at a hotel that has employees trained to address the commercial sexual exploitation of children, you can feel good knowing that you’re supporting businesses taking a stand, and real steps, against child sex trafficking.

Or, if your favorite hotel has not signed The Code, use this letter to ask them to sign.

Every child has a right to grow up free from sexual exploitation and trafficking, and you can help by spending your travel dollars at a hotel working on this issue.

To learn more about traveling responsibly, read our full report and visit our responsible traveler page.